kaisertheshepherd
kaisertheshepherd:

guidedogintraining:

Let’s do a thing! We are 5 followers away from 10,000 so here’s a challenge to celebrate! I wanted to challenge myself to post at least one photo a day and I’m hoping the topics will help me work on my photography and get creative.
If anyone wants to join in there’s a tag I’ll be tracking! Not particularly expecting anyone to join in but you know, just in case. 
Happy September!

We want to play! :D

kaisertheshepherd:

guidedogintraining:

Let’s do a thing! We are 5 followers away from 10,000 so here’s a challenge to celebrate! I wanted to challenge myself to post at least one photo a day and I’m hoping the topics will help me work on my photography and get creative.

If anyone wants to join in there’s a tag I’ll be tracking! Not particularly expecting anyone to join in but you know, just in case. 

Happy September!

We want to play! :D

rickyhitler

rickyhitler:

weaselwoman:

A pug so exhausted that he is trying to sleep standing up because he cannot breathe laying down.

This is a very common occurrence in pugs (and other brachy breeds) that is just horrifying. Pugs who do this will need a special wall bed to sleep standing up. 

Why intentionally doom an animal to a life time of suffering before it’s even born because it’s “cute” or “breed standard”?

Are pugs still adorable for your visual pleasure now?

pugs should go extinct

feliscanis
tailovecna:

rickyhitler:

thembulldawgs:

thembulldawgs:

It is unfortunate that typical exercise tools like the Spring Pole and Flirt Pole are considered “Dog Fighting Paraphernalia”.
People who own breeds other than APBT’s use these tools…does that mean they also fight dogs? 
What will the HSUS and SPCA label as Dog fighting paraphernalia next? Dog food?…they are a joke and the reason why so many good APBT owners get into trouble with the law just because they own one of these tools.
The spring and flirt pole are excellent ways to tire out high energy dog’s and provide good exercise. I myself use a flirt pole on a daily basis to exercise my Bull breed mutt dog. So does that make me a dog fighter? I think not.
-Blank

reblogging

I wonder how long until the SPCA comes and arrests me for using a flirt pole with my cat..

Other things considered to be dog fighting paraphenalia by HSUS:
Treadmills
Vitamins
fucking washtubs and sponges
(source)

tailovecna:

rickyhitler:

thembulldawgs:

thembulldawgs:

It is unfortunate that typical exercise tools like the Spring Pole and Flirt Pole are considered “Dog Fighting Paraphernalia”.

People who own breeds other than APBT’s use these tools…does that mean they also fight dogs? 

What will the HSUS and SPCA label as Dog fighting paraphernalia next? Dog food?…they are a joke and the reason why so many good APBT owners get into trouble with the law just because they own one of these tools.

The spring and flirt pole are excellent ways to tire out high energy dog’s and provide good exercise. I myself use a flirt pole on a daily basis to exercise my Bull breed mutt dog. So does that make me a dog fighter? I think not.

-Blank

reblogging

I wonder how long until the SPCA comes and arrests me for using a flirt pole with my cat..

Other things considered to be dog fighting paraphenalia by HSUS:

  • Treadmills
  • Vitamins
  • fucking washtubs and sponges

(source)

pedanticmonster
lizplz:

ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

I’VE LITERALLY ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW WHY THEY DID THIS THANK YOU FOREVER DOG SCIENCE PERSON

lizplz:

ulfric-ulfprick:

godotal:

hkirkh:

Confused husky pup

He’s not expressing confusion, he’s tilting his head for better sound localization. While having an ear on each side of the head is good for lateral echolocation, tilting the head so that the ears are offset gives it vertical depth.

doG SCIENCE

I’VE LITERALLY ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW WHY THEY DID THIS THANK YOU FOREVER DOG SCIENCE PERSON
feliscanis
raw-fed-pets:

Dogs’ Evolution Shows Why They ‘Love’ Gnawing on Bones
Scientists say they have discovered why dogs love to eat meat and bones.
Ancient canines adopted pack-living about eight million years ago, to hunt larger prey, according to researchers.The resulting evolution of their jaws gradually turned the ancestors of modern wolves, and ultimately our own pets, into “hypercarnivores”. He and his colleagues from the National University of Colombia have created a canine “family tree”, piecing together the relationships between each of the more than 300 dog species.
The only way that dogs roaming the open plains could snatch very large prey from a herd was to work together.”And after many generations of this grouping behaviour, there are new selective pressures on their [skull shape],” said the researcher. This pressure meant that animals with larger teeth and stronger jaws were more likely to succeed in hunting, and to survive to pass on their large-toothed, strong-jawed genes to the next generation.
Animals with stronger jaws and larger canine teeth would have been more successful hunters. "They developed strength in their muscles - especially the muscles that close their mouth," said Dr Munoz-Doran. "And bones that are more resistant to bending, so they could support the mechanical strains of biting the prey. Over time, they became adapted to be ‘hypercarnivorous’."The researcher pointed out that domestic dogs had "very good evolutionary reasons to enjoy chewing a bone".
"They have the tools to do that, and they want to use their tools".
Source Article: BBC

raw-fed-pets:

Dogs’ Evolution Shows Why They ‘Love’ Gnawing on Bones

Scientists say they have discovered why dogs love to eat meat and bones.

Ancient canines adopted pack-living about eight million years ago, to hunt larger prey, according to researchers.The resulting evolution of their jaws gradually turned the ancestors of modern wolves, and ultimately our own pets, into “hypercarnivores”. He and his colleagues from the National University of Colombia have created a canine “family tree”, piecing together the relationships between each of the more than 300 dog species.

The only way that dogs roaming the open plains could snatch very large prey from a herd was to work together.”And after many generations of this grouping behaviour, there are new selective pressures on their [skull shape],” said the researcher. This pressure meant that animals with larger teeth and stronger jaws were more likely to succeed in hunting, and to survive to pass on their large-toothed, strong-jawed genes to the next generation.

Animals with stronger jaws and larger canine teeth would have been more successful hunters. "They developed strength in their muscles - especially the muscles that close their mouth," said Dr Munoz-Doran. "And bones that are more resistant to bending, so they could support the mechanical strains of biting the prey. Over time, they became adapted to be ‘hypercarnivorous’."The researcher pointed out that domestic dogs had "very good evolutionary reasons to enjoy chewing a bone".

"They have the tools to do that, and they want to use their tools".

Source Article: BBC